Motor vehicle accidents span the spectrum of severity. Some individuals are able to escape their wrecks with nothing more than a story to tell, while those on the other end of the spectrum suffer catastrophic injuries that affect their brain and/or spinal cord. Those with more severe injuries can face enormous hardships as they try to navigate life post-accident, which can include crushing medical and rehabilitation expenses, lost wages, and, of course, physical and emotional pain and suffering. Those who wind up disabled on account of their car accident can find themselves feeling hopeless about the future.

But if you or a loved one are in this position, then you need to know that there are things that you can do to minimize the affect of disability and find new meaning in life. This can make you feel hopeful about the future again and give you back the control over your life that you deserve. Here are a few things to consider as you or your loved one move forward with disability post-accident:

  • It’s okay to be emotional after suffering your injuries: After a serious car accident, you’re probably going to feel a wide array of emotions, from anger to sadness to desperation. All of these feelings are normal. You shouldn’t try to bury them either. Instead, allow yourself to recognize them and feel them. This is the best way to accept your newfound medical condition and find a path forward. So, don’t pressure yourself to always look happy.
  • Don’t focus on what your injuries have taken from you: It’s easy to dwell on things that you can’t change, including any physical limitations thrust upon you by your car accident. But doing so isn’t productive. In fact, it can be harmful to your mental and emotional wellbeing, and it can prevent you from learning how to cope with your condition.
  • Focus on what you can do: A disability won’t take everything from you. So, focus on what you can still do and get better at it. This will make you feel like you’re accomplishing new goals and aren’t limited by your disability. Just be sure to set realistic goals for yourself so that you’re not setting yourself up for failure.
  • Keep an open mind: There may be new technologies, medications, and medical treatments that can make living with your condition easier, whether they address physical or mental health. By being open and accepting of these new approaches, you might make living with a disability just a little bit easier.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for help: We all let your pride get in the way at some point or another, but doing so after suffering a serious injury isn’t the time. Chances are you have a support system that is willing to step in to help you out in a moment’s notice. You’ve got enough to deal with that others can’t help with, so let them assist you where they can. This can ease the burden on you and build relationships. Also, recognize that this support can come from family friends, and professionals like those in the mental health field. Joining a support group can prove beneficial, too.
  • Divert your attention to the things that really matter: What’s most important to you? Is it being with your loved ones? Woodworking? Writing? Enjoying nature? Whatever it is that you love, try to focus your attention on it. We think that by doing so you’ll lose focus on your disability and your limitations. Not completely, of course, but it will certainly help.

There are a lot of other issues you’ll have to contend with as a result of your serious injuries. For example, you might have to equip your home with ramps, handlebars, and other fixtures that make getting around easier. All of this, in addition to your other economic and noneconomic damages can be overwhelming, but another type of help that you can receive is legal assistance. An attorney who knows how to handle these types of cases might be able to help you assess the facts of your case and build persuasive legal arguments that seek to recover compensation. Hopefully then you’ll have the financial stability and accountability you need to focus on the tips discussed above.